Meeting Nov. 4, 6:00pm in the Student Union Room 3407

Our next UNC WISE meeting will be on Monday, November 4 at 6:00 pm in a new room, Student Union Room 3407 and snacks will be provided. This month Erin Redman will lead a discussion on how to stop selling ourselves short and be awesome instead. Then Caitlin McMahon will share with us the great life and work of Dr. Alice Stewart. Please see below for more details and recommended reading below.

Also, as the year comes to a close so does the tenure of WISE’s current executive board. Elections for the board will take place at our December meeting and we will begin asking for nominations at our next November meeting. More details on the board responsibilities and elections will be shared at the next meeting, but now is a good time to start considering if you are interested in taking a leadership role in WISE for the upcoming calendar year. We encourage highly self-motivated members who are invested in maintaining and creating programs to promote gender equality issues and scientific outreach to consider running. This is also a great way to gain leadership skills and build your resume.

We’re looking forward to a very interesting meeting and hope you all can join us!

Thanks,

WISE Executive Board

 

It Had to Be You (Not Me)! Women’s Attributional Rationalization of Their Contributions to Successful Joint Work Outcomes

By: Michelle C. Haynes and Madeline E. Heilman

Group work is often a necessity in the workforce and potentially mandatory in the lab environment. Although the presence of women in the workforce, and in science careers in particular, is increasing studies have shown that women still tend to devalue their contributions to collaborative projects. This week’s discussion will focus on the potential causes of this phenomenon, citing specifically the study published by Haynes and Heilman in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin earlier this year.

Reading: http://psp.sagepub.com/content/early/2013/05/03/0146167213486358.full.pdf+html

Dr. Alice Stewart was a remarkable woman – a physician, epidemiologist, mother, and somewhat of a controversial activist. In the face of much opposition, Dr. Stewart helped make epidemiology what it is today and was persistent in making her research heard. An excerpt from her obituary in 2002 summarizes her work and accomplishments:

“Alice Stewart, who has died aged 95, achieved worldwide fame, and changed medical practice, through her tenacious investigations and demonstration of the connection between fetal x-rays and child cancers. She went on to attract the enmity of the nuclear and health physics establishments – and the hostility of the British and American governments – by insisting that her studies showed that the adverse effects of exposure to low-level radiation were far more serious than had been officially accepted. She was also the first woman member of the Association of Physicians, and only the ninth (and youngest) to become a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians.”

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s